MINDFULNESS FOR THE MOVEMENT


 

origins

When doing good became good for me 

Angeline Harris and Spencer Ingram met while working at Lee, Wooden & Ziegler LLP, one of the most sought-after corporate firms in the country. Angeline focused on Arts & Entertainment and Spencer specialized in Digital Media & Technology. We found that their individual fields complemented each other’s in surprising, and what turned out to be inseparable, ways. Technology was changing the arts and vice versa. This made them eager to cultivate their own practice, one that would effectively intersect their expertise with their respective interests. They believe that what wins a case and what makes a creative business thrive is the passion that drives it. Choosing to specialize in a field means that you are completely devoted to it; that you will protect it as if it were your own. That is the energy that sets them apart.

own practice, one that would effectively intersect their expertise with their respective interests. They believe that what wins a case and what makes a creative business thrive 

 

ADVOCACY & LEGACY

What is mindfulness really about? 

So many places I look these days, I see the faces of white women and billionaire CEOs representing mindfulness in the West. They do not use mindfulness to open the mind, but to refuel the body. They use my family’s ancient peace as a tool for capitalism. 

Aside from the individual work I aim to do 1-on-1, I am also in the fight to decolonize mediative and mindful practices in the United States. 

Mine is a mindfulness for the movement. 

An issue of TIME magazine featuring a normative white woman with her eyes closed and word "mindfulness" across her chest sits in a rack at a Whole Foods grocery store in Phoenix, Arizona. June, 2017

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Thich Nhat Hanh with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. who in 1967 nominated Nhat Hanh for the Nobel Peace prize. 

IAt first glance, there seems to be a contradiction in using mindfulness for social and political liberation. After all, mindfulness asks us to appreciate the beauty and peace that already exists in the world while the revolution, by definition, requires us to spend time imagining how it is that we wish the world were. There is a battle, here, between the present tense and the subjunctive tense. 

But that is at first glance. 

t would be wrong to forget the influence that … had on the … movement or that …. had on …. And of course, it would be detrimental to forget Thich Nhat Hanh and his movement work against the U.S. occupation of Vietnam in the 1970s. 

I aim to bring the practice of centering to the people who need it most - our organizers, caretakers, builders, poet, planners, schemer, dreamers, and any peoples who spend their days imagining and building a better world.